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Resources by AGE

Page history last edited by Rich Espey 8 years, 6 months ago

Useful resources are arranged here by age appropriateness.

 

Resources for Early Elementary Age (Grades K-2)
 
Core Document - Putting Gay in a Positive Context
The core document of our FACA includes important definitions and basic tenets for understanding sexual orientation. It also includes a list of 12 things all classroom teachers can do to affirm gay students and families and create classrooms that help all students to see gay people in a fair and positive context.
What does this mean? A detailed glossary of terms with more definitions than those provided by the core document.
Books
This is a list both of books we've read and books we've yet to read, grouped according to age. Lower School Books
Resources for Late Elementary Age (Grades 3 - 5)
 
Core Document - Putting Gay in a Positive Context
The core document of our FACA includes important definitions and basic tenets for understanding sexual orientation. It also includes a list of 12 things all classroom teachers can do to affirm gay students and families and create classrooms that help all students to see gay people in a fair and positive context.
What does this mean? A detailed glossary of terms with more definitions than those provided by the core document.
Books This is a list both of books we've read and books we've yet to read, grouped according to age. Lower School Books
Resources for Middle School (Grades 6 - 8)
 
Core Document - Putting Gay in a Positive Context
The core document of our FACA includes important definitions and basic tenets for understanding sexual orientation. It also includes a list of 12 things all classroom teachers can do to affirm gay students and families and create classrooms that help all students to see gay people in a fair and positive context.
What does this mean? A detailed glossary of terms with more definitions than those provided by the core document.
 Books This is a list both of books we've read and books we've yet to read, grouped according to age. Middle School Books
I'm here, I'm queer, what the hell do I read? A great book resource for YA Literature
Park Middle School Gay-Straight Alliance A link the Park Middle School GSA website
Straight Privilege Checklist Adapted by Earlham College from Peggy McIntosh's "Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack" about white privilege, this document lists dozens of ways straight people are privileged in our society. You might ask students to brainstorm ways in which straight people are privileged and then reveal this list at the end.
PFLAG's  10 Ways to Make Schools Safer
A helpful quick read for advisors and faculty looking to make schools safer (and understand why that's important) around issues of sexual identity in 10 brief bullets.
Advocates for Youth

"Advocates for Youth champions efforts to help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their reproductive and sexual health." Their GLBTQ section is terrific, easy to navigate, is filled with fact and data filled language, and features straightforward to the point language and is relatively jargon free. The site contains lesson plans and a bunch of helpful "Tips and Strategies" for working with various youth populations. Debbie Roffman calls this site "one of the premiere sites in the field". A stellar resource for faculty and advisors who want to feel more informed and empowered about the issues GLBTQ teens face.

New York Times article "Coming out in Middle School" was a cover article in the New York Times Magazine in September 2009.

Resources for Upper School (Grades 9 - 12)

 

Core Document - Putting Gay in a Positive Context
The core document of our FACA includes important definitions and basic tenets for understanding sexual orientation. It also includes a list of 12 things all classroom teachers can do to affirm gay students and families and create classrooms that help all students to see gay people in a fair and positive context.
What does this mean? A detailed glossary of terms with more definitions than those provided by the core document.
  Books This is a list both of books we've read and books we've yet to read, grouped according to age. Upper School Books
Straight Privilege Checklist Adapted by Earlham College from Peggy McIntosh's "Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack" about white privilege, this document lists dozens of ways straight people are privileged in our society. You might ask students to brainstorm ways in which straight people are privileged and then reveal this list at the end.
PFLAG's  10 Ways to Make Schools Safer
A helpful quick read for advisors and faculty looking to make schools safer (and understand why that's important) around issues of sexual identity in 10 brief bullets.
Advocates for Youth

"Advocates for Youth champions efforts to help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their reproductive and sexual health." Their GLBTQ section is terrific, easy to navigate, is filled with fact and data filled language, and features straightforward to the point language and is relatively jargon free. The site contains lesson plans and a bunch of helpful "Tips and Strategies" for working with various youth populations. Debbie Roffman calls this site "one of the premiere sites in the field".

A stellar resource for faculty and advisors who want to feel more informed and empowered about the issues GLBTQ teens face.

Youth Resource

YouthResource is a website by and for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender youth, that takes a  holistic approach to sexual health and issues of concern to queer youth. YouthResource features teen and young adult peer educators and is run by the Advocates for Youth.

Campus Pride Of interest to students when considering college choices. Their Mission Statement: "Campus Pride serves LGBT and Ally student leaders and/or campus organizations in the areas of leadership development, support programs and services to create safer, more inclusive LGBT-friendly colleges and universities. It exists to develop, support and give “voice and action” in building future LGBT and ally student leaders."
   

 

 

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